Tuesday, 8 November 2016

Targeting the seven basic patterns associated with depression: 5. Drawing the line

This is the fifth in a series of seven blog posts  published over several weeks in which I explain briefly how the symptoms of depression are dealt with using hypnotic suggestion and neuro-linguistic programming (NLP). I will post links to the other articles as they become available. The session structures are based on the work of the American psychologist Dr Michael Yapko and the co-founder of the "Human Givens" psychological system, Dr Joe Griffin. This approach provides a gradual lifting of depression symptoms over the seven week programme. It works by targeting the unconscious thought processes that the depressed state is built upon.

1. Dealing with sleep disturbance

2. Looking forward to the future optimistically

3. It's time to do something different

4. The complex issue of control (follow the links to my earlier posts)


5. Drawing the line

One of the typical thought patterns associated with the depressed state of mind is what Michael Yapko calls "global" thinking; defined as a tendency to see only the big picture and not the individual parts that make up that picture. He describes it as seeing only the forest, and not the individual trees. This way of thinking is what leads to the feeling of being overwhelmed which is frequently experienced during depression. The fifth session of the programme is generally when this particular thought pattern is addressed.

Being able to break down that big picture into smaller, more manageable chunks enables the client to get a sense of control and of priority about their thoughts and problems. This means they can then be tackled one at a time - rather than all at once. After all, doing everything all at once would be overwhelming even for the most organised of individuals!

This session introduces the client to the concept of boundaries - both internal and external ones. Internally we can  separate our thoughts from our feelings, our impulses and urges from our actions, and our work life from our personal life. There are also different "parts" to our personalities; compassionate parts, determined parts, playful parts, and so on. Each part is useful in different circumstances, and less so in others. The hypnotic part of the session encourages the client to explore these inner resources, and the boundaries between them. Externally, especially in our interactions with others, we can learn to separate what belongs to us from what belongs to others, what we believe from what others believe, that the opinions of others are only opinions and not facts, and how we can explore what others demand of us and decide what we are prepared to give. The hypnotic process is also designed to  help the client instinctively draw lines and boundaries between these parts and these concepts, and to notice automatically when someone  is attempting to cross the boundary in an unwanted way. The client becomes able to confidently deal with such "invasions" by automatically accessing the appropriate internal part for any given situation. The result is an increasing feeling of control in a world that had previously seemed beyond control.


Links to the seven stages will be posted here as they become available:
  1. Dealing with sleep disturbance
  2. Looking to the future optimistically
  3. It’s time to do something different
  4. The complex issue of control
  5. Drawing the line
  6. Guilty or not guilty?
  7. Prevention
If you are a depression sufferer and would like a more detailed and specific explanation of how this approach could work for you, please feel free to contact me to organise a free introductory consultation.





021 487 6072

Monday, 18 July 2016

Targeting the seven basic patterns associated with depression: 4. The complex issue of control

This is the fourth in a series of seven blog posts to be published over the coming weeks in which I will explain briefly how the symptoms of depression are dealt with using hypnotic suggestion and neuro-linguistic programming (NLP). I will post links to the other articles as they become available. The session structures are based on the work of the American psychologist Dr Michael Yapko and the co-founder of the "Human Givens" psychological system, Dr Joe Griffin. This approach provides a gradual lifting of depression symptoms over the seven week programme. It works by targeting the unconscious thought processes that the depressed state is built upon.

1. Dealing with sleep disturbance

2. Looking forward to the future optimistically

3. It's time to do something different (follow the links to my earlier posts)


4. The complex issue of control

Everyone wants to be in control of their own life and their own destiny as much as is possible, but most people understand that not everything in life is in fact controllable, no matter how much they would wish it to be otherwise. Sometimes things go wrong, despite their best efforts. It's the way life can be.

The depressed patient very often has a distorted perception of issues of control. This is generally in one of two ways:

The first of these ways is the perception of oneself as being helpless in the face of circumstances or of the actions of other people. In short, it could be described as a "victim" mentality. Everything is out of control, there is always someone or something else to blame. The sufferer sees themselves as being unable to control the external people or events that are responsible for his or her predicament and are causing the depression. Of course, this type of thinking is itself out of control and actually contributes to and reinforces the depression.

The other side of the coin is the distorted pattern thinking referred to as illusion of control. Well-meaning maxims such as "where there's a will, there's a way" or the perceived "power of positive thinking", or the "law of attraction" as marketed by many self-help books lead many people to have unrealistic expectations of what they are actually can control. When things don't work out as planned, disappointment, frustration, and often anger can ensue. It's another route to the same destination; a feeling of being the victim of circumstances and life being out of control.

Self esteem is the first casualty of these thought patterns. Session four of the programme is chiefly about rebuilding this, by hypnotically teaching the client to understand better what is in his or her control, and what is not. This leads to better choices being made about where emotions are to be invested, and a recovering sense of becoming more and more in control of one's feelings - and one's life. The client becomes ready for the next phase, which is dealing with boundaries; what is my problem, and what is someone else's? That will be the subject of the next session and the next article in this series.

Links to the seven stages will be posted here as they become available:
  1. Dealing with sleep disturbance
  2. Looking to the future optimistically
  3. It’s time to do something different
  4. The complex issue of control
  5. Drawing the line
  6. Guilty or not guilty?
  7. Prevention
If you are a depression sufferer and would like a more detailed and specific explanation of how this approach could work for you, please feel free to contact me to organise a free introductory consultation.




021 487 6072






Wednesday, 29 June 2016

Targeting the seven basic patterns associated with depression: 3. It's time to do something different

This is the third in a series of seven blog posts to be published over the coming weeks in which I will explain briefly how the symptoms of depression are dealt with using hypnotic suggestion and neuro-linguistic programming (NLP). I will post links to the other articles as they become available. The session structures are based on the work of the American psychologist Dr Michael Yapko and the co-founder of the "Human Givens" psychological system, Dr Joe Griffin. This approach provides a gradual lifting of depression symptoms over the seven week programme. It works by targeting the unconscious thought processes that the depressed state is built upon.

1. Dealing with sleep disturbance
2. Looking forward to the future optimistically
(follow the links to my earlier posts)


3. It's time to do something different


Depressed people often describe themselves as being stuck, maybe in a rut or in a loop, or as being helpless (or even hopeless) in the face of their troubles. Typically whatever it is they are doing is not helping them, but they are unable to think of an alternative to their familiar strategy.

We all have ways of coping with life's experiences that have served us well over the years. We come to rely on these strategies and for the most part, and for most people they work. Sometimes, however, something happens that is outside our experience and that seems to demand a new pattern; a new way of thinking. A depression sufferer seems unable to create a new pattern of thinking, and becomes trapped in the loop of constantly reviewing the same thoughts and ideas. As these are the very same thoughts and ideas that have so far consistently failed to solve the problem, the feelings of hopelessness magnify and the depression gets worse. It is, indeed, a very vicious circle.

It is in the third session of the depression therapy programme that we really begin to tackle this self-defeating thought process, and the client is encouraged in the trance process to develop a more flexible approach and to move away from worry and towards problem solving. Hypnosis is vital here. Every depressed person knows consciously and logically that they need to do something different. Hypnosis is the key to unlocking the door to the unconscious (or subconscious) part of the mind which is after all where the problem actually is. Depression is not a conscious choice - no one would choose to be depressed; it is an unconscious choice, so it is in the unconscious mind where the most important work is done. That is why this approach is so much faster than CBT or traditional counselling in achieving relief. Hypnosis accesses the problem area directly.

By the next session, the client is typically beginning to see some changes, and we will move on to discuss a feeling that most sufferers have - that of not being in control of their life. That will be the subject of the next blog post in this series.


Links to the seven stages will be posted here as they become available:
  1. Dealing with sleep disturbance
  2. Looking to the future optimistically
  3. It’s time to do something different
  4. The complex issue of control
  5. Drawing the line
  6. Guilty or not guilty?
  7. Prevention
If you are a depression sufferer and would like a more detailed and specific explanation of how this approach could work for you, please feel free to contact me to organise a free introductory consultation.



021 487 6072

Wednesday, 22 June 2016

Talk to me!

I always speak personally to new clients before they start therapy or coaching. Not all therapists do this, but I believe it is essential that every potential client has a good understanding of what to expect from their time with me. This is the reason I do not use online booking agencies. I want to be sure that my customer knows what they are buying, that their expectations are realistic, and that I am the right person to help them achieve those expectations.

In some cases, a telephone chat is all that is needed to answer any questions and to explain how the process is likely to work. Typically people looking for coaching, or to remove a habit or a phobia would fall into this category. These are problems that are normally dealt with in a single session.

If treatment is likely to be longer, the potential client really deserves a face to face meeting to explain exactly into what they are investing their time, money and emotions. This is why I offer a free introductory consultation to persons interested in therapy for anxiety conditions, panic attacks, depression and weight loss. It gives you a chance to meet me and decide if you are comfortable working with me. It gives me a chance to explain the process, what it might feel like, and to answer any questions regarding it.

So if you wish to talk to me, just pick up the phone....

021 487 6072
www.riversidehypnotherapy.com

Thursday, 2 June 2016

Targeting the seven basic patterns associated with depression: 2. Looking forward to the future optimistically

This is the second in a series of seven blog posts to be published over the coming weeks in which I will explain briefly how the symptoms of depression are dealt with using hypnotic suggestion and neuro-linguistic programming (NLP). I will post links to the other articles as they become available. The session structures are based on the work of the American psychologist Dr Michael Yapko and the co-founder of the "Human Givens" psychological system, Dr Joe Griffin. This approach provides a gradual lifting of depression symptoms over the seven week programme. It works by targeting the unconscious thought processes that the depressed state is built upon.

1. Dealing with sleep disturbance (follow the link to my earlier post)

2. Looking forward to the future optimistically

One of the foundation stones upon which the depressed state is built is that of the sufferer's negative expectations. It is typical for depressed persons to believe that the future is only going to bring them exactly the same kind of painful experiences that the present is giving them or that they have experienced in the past. It is very difficult for them to see a positive future, Even though they may understand at a logical, conscious level that the outlook is not totally bleak, the unconscious mind remains firmly unconvinced!

The second session of the programme is usually when I begin to address these thought patterns in earnest, although some preliminary work has already been done in session one. The aim is to build a positivity about the therapeutic process and about the client's future life. Hypnosis is used to produce a deeply relaxed state, during which the unconscious mind is provided with suggestion that the person's future experience is, in fact, actually changeable and not rigidly fixed. The client begins to understand at a very deep level that change is inevitable, and that it is going to happen at different levels of experience - not just the conscious level; and is going to start straight away. Hypnotic suggestion is intrinsic to the way the process works. The client begins to change his or her thought patterns without consciously realising they are doing it, because hypnosis allows us to access the unconscious mind directly; and it is of course, in the unconscious mind, not the logical conscious mind, where the problem lives.

As with all the sessions in this programme, the hypnotic session is recorded for the client's use at home. This enables repeated exposure to positive suggestion, and therefore more rapid change. The recorded session is also designed to start to align the client's thought process towards their own involvement in the therapy; a realisation that they need to start to do something different in order to get a different outcome, and a different set of feelings too. That concept will form the main theme of the next session.....

Links to the seven stages will be posted here as they become available:
  1. Dealing with sleep disturbance
  2. Looking to the future optimistically
  3. It’s time to do something different
  4. The complex issue of control
  5. Drawing the line
  6. Guilty or not guilty?
  7. Prevention
If you are a depression sufferer and would like a more detailed and specific explanation of how this approach could work for you, please feel free to contact me to organise a free introductory consultation.


021 487 6072

Thursday, 26 May 2016

Targeting the seven basic patterns associated with depression: 1. Dealing with sleep disturbance


This is the first in a series of seven blog posts to be published over the coming weeks in which I will explain briefly how the symptoms of depression are dealt with using hypnotic suggestion and neuro-linguistic programming (NLP). I will post links to the other articles as they become available. The session structures are based on the work of the American psychologist Dr Michael Yapko and the co-founder of the "Human Givens" psychological system, Dr Joe Griffin. This approach provides a gradual lifting of depression symptoms over the seven week programme. It works by targeting the unconscious thought processes that the depressed state is built upon.

1. Dealing with sleep disturbance

Problems sleeping are almost invariably present in depression, and they are the first thing I deal with in session one.

Sleep disturbance is generally categorised as Primary, Middle, or Terminal Insomnia. Any of the three types can be associated with depression, but Terminal Insomnia is the most common one for depressed clients.
  1. Primary Insomnia is the term used when one has difficulty falling asleep on first going to bed.
  2. Middle Insomnia refers to waking up after a short time and then being unable to get back to sleep again, thus interrupting the middle part of the sleep cycle.
  3. Terminal Insomnia is the pattern where one awakens an hour or two before they really need to, and are unable to get back to sleep. The terminal or final phase of sleep is disturbed.
In each case, the key factor responsible is what is known as “rumination”. Typically thoughts continue to loop round over and over again as the sufferer tries to solve problems, past present or future. They may be replaying events and conversations or perhaps planning conversations and interactions which are yet to come. It is usually about things which either cannot be resolved, or about which the person has no real control and so feels powerless about. The rumination process seems to develop a life of its own and it feels like it is impossible to stop it.

The process is a purely unconscious one. It is the unconscious mind that is trying to obtain resolution or “closure” on a subject that is outside of its control to do so. Hypnosis is the key to changing this unconscious cycle. It is actually not important what the client is ruminating about, but rather how they do it. The hypnotic session is recorded for the client’s personal use at home. It disrupts and disables the thought patterns of rumination and enables natural sleep to take over. It creates a boundary between waking life and sleeping life, enabling the client to go to sleep with a mind free from life’s waking problems and thus able to naturally replenish and rejuvenate for the next day. It also serves to sabotage the rumination process when it occurs during the waking hours too, and begins to ready the client for the work in session two – which is all about moving away from negativity and starting to see the future with optimism.

Links to the seven stages will be posted here as they become available:
  1. Dealing with sleep disturbance
  2. Looking to the future optimistically
  3. It’s time to do something different
  4. The complex issue of control
  5. Drawing the line
  6. Guilty or not guilty?
  7. Prevention
If you are a depression sufferer and would like a more detailed and specific explanation of how this approach could work for you, please feel free to contact me to organise a free introductory consultation.


021 487 6072

Wednesday, 4 May 2016

Is it possible to find balance in life?

In my coaching work I meet many people who tell me they are looking to achieve a better "balance" between their working lives and their family and social lives. For some reason, the phrase popped into my head a couple of days ago while I was enjoying a cup of coffee and I began wondering about the implications of using "balance" as a metaphor.

Of course, when used in this context, "balance" is intended to portray a healthy situation in which all the constituent components are in their right places and in the right amounts. However, there are alternative meanings of the word which imply conflict, or the bearing of multiple burdens, which are perhaps not as useful as concepts. A balance can be a weighing scale, like the zodiac sign Libra, attempting to balance two loads of equal weight. It can refer to a balance of account - the difference between positive assets and negative liabilities. When you lose balance, the outcome is generally not good. It is something that has to be constantly maintained. Whichever way it is used, the metaphor of balance does rather convey the image of trying to accommodate two opposing forces, each entirely separate from the other.

Cats may have nine lives, but as far as we know, humans have just the one. Work life, social life, and family life are actually all aspects of the one life. I would like to suggest that a better metaphor to use is to strive for "harmony" rather than "balance". After all, why should each part of one's life exist in isolation? It's all the one life. 

The three notes of a major chord exist as separate notes, but when played together, simultaneously, they become something greater than the sum of the parts. It can be okay to consider "down" time as part of your job. It's as important to do "down" time well as it is to work hard. Productivity is so much more than the amount of time spent with your nose to the grindstone. A little mental time out can be beneficial; increasing work efficiency rather than decreasing it. I always allow myself time between clients to ensure that I am in the right mental state for the next appointment. Certainly, I could see more people in a shorter time - but I would be much less effective. On the other hand, I do not mind spending time working in "home" time or at weekends if it actually helps me and makes my overall life easier and more effective. Sometimes it is easier just to deal with something now, than to be thinking about doing it tomorrow at work. It's all the one life. It's all what I do. It's all my "job".

Give it a try, and see if it works for you too. Work and personal life do not need to be rigidly delineated. If you occasionally do "home" things in "work" time or vice versa is that any great loss, provided your overall effectiveness is increased in both areas? Try living harmoniously for a change.


021 487 6072

Thursday, 24 March 2016

Over-eating

Food is the fuel that animals, such as humans, need to keep their biological functions operating. Without this fuel, and the oxygen we breathe, we do not have the energy to exist. Animals know this instinctively, and consume the precise amount of food they need at any particular time. Unless stressed, it is rare to see any non-human eat in any other than a healthy manner.

Humans of course, are a little more complicated. The well developed frontal lobes unique to the human brain have evolved to give us the ability to form abstract concepts and associations, often at an unconscious level. Food is not just fuel to a human - it's a sensory and sometimes a social experience too. It also can have associations of which we are consciously unaware - such as "comfort" or "reward". These associations have usually been programmed into the unconscious mind during childhood. When a baby cries, it can learn that its needs are to be satisfied by having something placed in its mouth, Whether a bottle, breast or simply a "soother", the result can be that the child begins to associate comfort with something in its mouth. This is not necessarily a problem but can manifest later in life as one of many oral habits, such as thumb-sucking, nail biting, smoking and of course "comfort" eating, if the childish programming persists into adulthood. Beyond the baby stage, children are often rewarded by being given chocolate or other sweet items. This is much more avoidable! Birthdays and special occasions are often associated with food too; parties, cake or even a visit to McDonalds. Once again a connection is being made at an unconscious level; food means I'm a good boy/girl. I am special.

In his book "I can make you thin", Paul McKenna said people with weight problems think about food all the time - that is until they are eating it! Then they proceed to shovel it into their mouths so quickly they sometimes don't even taste it. The result is they have already consumed more food than they need before their brain has even had chance to register the fact that they are not hungry any more. Part of the answer is to eat slowly and consciously. Never eat at the desk or in front of the TV. Take one bite at a time and chew and swallow before picking up the knife and fork (or the food) again. You will end up eating less, but enjoying it just as much, if not more. This is one of the tips I give to people looking to change their attitude to food by using hypnosis and neuro-linguistic programming.

As I write this blog, we are approaching Easter - which has become one of the worst over-eating festivals on the modern calendar. In the coming weeks people will start to think about holidays and losing weight, before eventually putting it back on again by Christmas! If you'd like to break out of the diet cycle and actually change your attitude to food and take back control for yourself, please check my web site for information. There is information there too about more complex eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia.

www.riversidehypnotherapy.com
021 487 6072


Monday, 14 March 2016

Happy St. Patrick's Day!

As an Englishman living in Ireland since 1992, I have always enjoyed the celebration of Ireland's national day. A celebration of national identity is something we English sadly lack; I suspect many of my compatriots wouldn't even know when St George's day is! 

Although St George's claim to fame was the slaying of a solitary dragon, St Patrick went a step further in the battle of saints versus reptiles by banishing all the snakes from Ireland. Where he sent them is unclear. I suspect they all ended up in my former homeland, finding eventual employment as politicians, but we'll let that pass!
Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Duit

I find it curious that so many Irish people have a phobia of snakes, considering they live in a country totally devoid of them. But there's nothing logical about a phobia is there? Fortunately for those with an irrational fear of snakes, (or spiders, or anything); help is at hand. In the 1970's the creator's of Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP) identified the thought processes behind the phobic response and developed an extremely rapid way to disrupt these patterns, leading to quick and permanent relief of the phobia in the majority of cases.

Be free of your phobia in less than an hour. Check my website or give me a call to find out more.


021 487 6072
www.riversidehypnotherapy.com

Wednesday, 24 February 2016

Depression

Despite ever-increasing prescribing and usage of anti-depressant drugs, rates of depression in the western world continue to rise. As a society, we do not appear to be winning the battle. Perhaps it is time to consider a different approach. I would like suggest that it is better to treat the process and causes of the depressed mindset than it is to simply treat the symptoms. Rather than simply accept that the depressed person has a"chemical imbalance" in their brain, I would prefer we wonder why that should be the case.

No two people's depression is the same, but there are common factors. Irish depression action group "AWARE" use the following convenient "Festival" acronym to list the main symptoms of depression.


The thought processes that underpin these symptoms are complex. Rumination is a common problem - those racing and seemingly uncontrollable thoughts that typically fill the mind when the patient is trying to sleep. There is also frequently a strong sense of lack of control, and of being overwhelmed by the demands of the situation, or of other people. Almost always there seems to be nothing to look forward to in the future, and often too, a sense of guilt for things in the past. The depressed individual often talks in "absolute" terms. "Everyone" is against me, "nothing" works, and so on.

So why don't people just think positively and simply stop being depressed? The difficulty is that most of this process is happening in the unconscious part of the mind. Consciously, the sufferer is acutely aware of the problem, but unable to find a way to deal with it. It's not as simple as "look on the bright side". The depressed mindset can become strangely and illogically comforting - a type of mental anaesthetic that distances the person, from the problems they are having; at least for that part of the time that rumination is not present! Depression can sometimes  be quite alluring for the unconscious mind, and quickly can become a habit. At its simplest, the unconscious would perhaps rather be depressed than, say, stressed. Even though it feels horrible, it can seem unconsciously to be better than the perceived alternative, and the new depressed thought patterns begin to take hold causing the brain chemistry  to alter to the "imbalance" referred to above.

To deal permanently with depression one needs to change these underlying thought processes, rather than just their chemical consequences. Some of this is done conversationally, but hypnosis is used to access the unconscious part of the mind - which is where the most important changes are needed. Typically therapy takes six or seven sessions - including the making of live recordings of the hypnotic part of the therapy for use later at home. These sessions are based around the following basic principles, but will vary according to the individual sufferer.
  • Getting a good night's sleep
  • Looking forward to the future in a positive way
  • Doing something different
  • What is and isn't in my control
  • Dealing with guilty feelings
  • Learning to draw the line
  • Prevention of future lapses into depression
There is a lot more to the process than can be detailed in a short blog post, and I will expand further on these principles in future posts. If you want to know more in the meantime, I offer free, introductory consultations to anyone wanting to be free of depression - so if you want to find out more about how I work and how I can help you, please feel free to call.

021 487 6072
www.riversidehypnotherapy.com

Thursday, 28 January 2016

Blushing

Blushing is a uniquely human response. No other creature does it. The reason why we do it is something that has intrigued psychologists and sociologists for a long time. Physiologically, the facial flush is a response to an adrenaline surge, most commonly triggered by feelings of embarrassment or guilt. It is yet another variant of the "fight or flight" response;  not a conscious action, once again we are in the realms of the unconscious (subconscious) mind.

Occasionally everyone does something, says something, or even just thinks something that they wish they had not; something that is perceived somehow as unacceptable in a social setting. On realising the error, we feel embarrassment or guilt. It seems to be the case that the blush response is a signal to others that "I am wrong and I acknowledge that". Indeed, studies have shown that people react more positively towards persons who blush than those who do not in such circumstances. So there is, in a way, a positive reason for blushing in certain situations. It's only when the mental trigger for blushing becomes too sensitive, and we blush too easily, that it becomes a problem. The blush itself becomes a source of embarrassment and the process feeds on itself!

Dealing with unconscious matters is, of course, where hypnosis can be extremely helpful. In a trance state, the conscious analytical part of the mind is pleasantly relaxed and distracted, making the unconscious more accessible to positive suggestion. Hypnotic suggestion can be used to interrupt the blush process, as well as helping to build a more positive and confident self image. In this way, the majority of blushing cases are treated in a single session. Unfortunately, results are not easy to predict, however and some blushing cases require a little more work. This happens in cases where  the problem originates from a childhood experience of embarrassment or guilt, but the incident is now consciously unknown to the sufferer. In such cases the symptom does not shift until the initial cause has been found and dealt with, usually requiring a further four or five sessions. 

If you'd like to know more about how hypnotherapy could help you, please give me a call on the number below. You can also find explanations of the different hypnotic approaches on my web site.


021 487 6072

Wednesday, 20 January 2016

It's all in your mind!

Anxiety, depression, phobia, stress - they are all in your mind. Of course they are. Where else would they be? So isn't it curious that orthodox medicine chooses to treat these conditions by putting something in your stomach? A pill for every ill has been a way of life for over a century; so much so that many people, including the majority of medical professionals, see it as the only way.

Of course drugs do have their place in managing the debilitating symptoms of anxiety and depression, but they do nothing to alter the underlying thought processes that are anxiety and depression. That's where the talk therapies come in; particularly those which access the unconscious (or subconscious) part of the mind, such as hypno-psychotherapy and neuro-linguistic programming (NLP). Permanent change can be achieved in between five and ten sessions, even in severe cases. Simple phobias are often treated in a single session. The key to this rapidity lies in the way these particular approaches bypass the logical, conscious mind and deal directly with the unconscious - something that counselling and CBT cannot do. 

After all, if it was a logical conscious problem, no-one would choose to continue being anxious or depressed. They would just stop.

You can find out more by reading the various articles on my clinic website www.riversidehypnotherapy.com or you can pick up the phone and make an appointment for a free, introductory consultation to find out how depression and anxiety need be nothing to worry about!

021 487 6072

Wednesday, 13 January 2016

The "vaping" craze

During over eight years of helping people stop smoking using hypnosis and NLP I have noticed that there is a similarity in the way people start with the habit in the first place. In the vast majority of cases it starts in the early teen years, and the reason is almost always the same - their friends were doing it, or older kids were, and that familiar teenage need to not be different from everyone else meant they had to do it too. I often think it's a pity that no-one realises that the "cool" people being emulated probably started smoking for the very same reasons when they were younger and more insecure! So, actually it is a childish habit, not a "grown-up" one.

In view of this, maybe it is not really surprising how the "vaping" craze has accelerated so spectacularly. Tobacco products are not allowed to be advertised any more, but suddenly bright and colourful e-cigarette shops are appearing on every shopping street as businesses realise there is still easy money to be made from the former tobacco market - not only from smokers wanting to give up, but by the young and impressionable who want to be a part of the latest and coolest fashion. Sell someone a habit and you have a customer for life.

An article in yesterday's Independent newspaper highlights the fact that the drug companies are now becoming interested in the vaping market. This is a sure sign that there is big money to be made, indeed the global market is estimated to be US€6 billion per year. The article, written by academics from the University of Warwick, also casts doubts on the efficacy of e-cigarettes in helping a patient stop smoking. To me, this is not surprising; after all, a paper in the British Medical Journal concluded that nicotine replacement therapy - that is, the old style chewing gum and patches - was considered "successful" being 6.75% more effective than placebo. Vaping is only another form of "nicotine replacement" so there is no reason to assume it will be any more effective. 

If 6.75% is considered a successful improvement then hypnotherapy combined with NLP must surely be a minor miracle! I know of no other method that is as effective and as rapid. The majority of people are smoke-free after one session, and relaxed about it too. Cravings gone, habit gone, and no need to keep buying a replacement product to feed a replacement habit!

Riverside Hypnotherapy and Coaching
www.riversidehypnotherapy.com
021 487 6072

Wednesday, 6 January 2016

New Year - New location!!!



Sometimes what first appears to be a crisis can turn out to be a blessing in disguise. In the middle of last year I learned that I would not be able to continue working from my established office, as the space was required by the landlord for other purposes connected to his own business. I didn't really want to move, but I soon began to see it as an opportunity rather than an unwanted problem and started to search for a new home for my business.


And now I'm there! After more than eight years based in Penrose Wharf, Riverside Hypnotherapy and Coaching has now moved to more comfortable and spacious accommodation within Old Bridge Therapy Rooms, at 2 Lavitt's Quay in the very centre of Cork City, overlooking St Patrick's Bridge.

The room has been completely refurbished for a professional, yet homely and comfortable feel. I'm delighted with it!


Having more space has enabled me to incorporate a counselling/supervision area as well as the more traditional reclining chair for hypnotic work.

Contact details remain as before:

021 487 6072